June 2011 Uganda Trip Day 3

Day 3:

My overnight flight from London to Uganda was decent.  I had a bulk head seat and slept about four hours.   We got to Uganda at about 8am.  The visa line was long.  The immigration officer looked at my passport and asked why I was only staying for 6 days.  I explained it was only a short trip and I couldn’t stay longer.  He pointed to my visa renewal stamp (my visa expired last year when I was in Uganda for so long and I had to get it extended, a huge pain!) and said that he didn’t want me to have to go through that again if I decided to stay longer so he gave me a 90 day visa.  :)

I’m always nervous my bags will get lost but all three were there!   I got my bags loaded on a cart and headed out.  Linda was out front waiting for me and it was so good to see her again!  We found Patrick outside in the car and made our way to our first stop – my friend Robin’s place!  I had a ton of stuff to deliver to Robin plus we had to see one of the sweet babies being adopted by one of our families.  We spent about an hour there sorting through donations, getting some pictures and catching up before heading off to our next visit.

We visited another babies home we’re currently working with, dropped off donations, met some adoptive parents in country, got updates on kids and went to visit the orphanage director who was in a local hospital sick with malaria.  Oh yeah, in between that we stopped and got some American dollars exchanged into shillings and went to the market and bought some supplies for the orphanages we were seeing that day.

Robin had told us about a new, poor orphanage in Entebbe she wanted us to check out.   So we took a bunch of food and a million pairs of underwear (thanks to the generous donations of our AAI families!) and set off to see what this new place was all about.  We were greeted at the orphanage by 40-some young children, most between the ages of 2-10.   We were led to the back of the property where we found a renovated chicken coop turned children’s home!

Several months ago a good Samaritan working on the islands of lake Victoria started taking in orphaned and abandoned children.   The story she told us was that she came home, asked her husband if she could bring some orphaned children back with her.   He said OK, how many?   Her reply:  40.  :)  They renovated the chicken coop and boys quarters and they are doing the best they can to care for them.   When we were there each child had ONE outfit (the one you see in the video).   On laundry day, the kids go naked until their clothes are done washing and then they put wet clothes back on.   They don’t have much of anything at all.   But my goodness, this lady is committed to these kids and the kids are seem so happy and full of life!  She showed us some pictures of the kids before they came and the transformation is amazing.    She’s doing a great job with the very little she has and I hope we have the chance to help her with some of her needs.

singing kids from sister haiti on Vimeo.

 

After this stop it was coming on evening and I was exhausted!  It was time to head to Kampala and get checked into the hostel.  It was my first time at Red Chilli, the most popular youth hostel in Uganda.  I was impressed!  I had a private, ensuite room for less than $30 per night.    It is very backpacker-ish so not the best fit for everyone but was perfectly adequate for me!   The bar/restaurant area (also the internet area) can get a little rowdy in the evenings but I never felt unsafe and everyone was super nice.    I ran a personal errand that evening (will come in a seperate post) then settled in for shower and bed.   All would have been almost perfect except the crazy dog outside my window that barked ALL NIGHT LONG.  So another night of not the best sleep but at least I was in a bed!  :) 

Day 4 coming soon!

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